Mail archive
alpine-devel

[alpine-devel] [PATCH] testing/exim: new APKBUILD. Modular package

From: Valery Kartel <valery.kartel_at_gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Dec 2014 08:36:57 +0200

---
 testing/exim/APKBUILD         |  140 +++--
 testing/exim/aliases          |   35 --
 testing/exim/exim.Makefile    | 1209 +----------------------------------------
 testing/exim/exim.pre-install |    6 +
 4 files changed, 114 insertions(+), 1276 deletions(-)
 delete mode 100644 testing/exim/aliases
 create mode 100644 testing/exim/exim.pre-install
diff --git a/testing/exim/APKBUILD b/testing/exim/APKBUILD
index 936ea35..ce4755d 100644
--- a/testing/exim/APKBUILD
+++ b/testing/exim/APKBUILD
_at_@ -2,27 +2,27 @@
 # Maintainer: Jesse Young <jlyo_at_jlyo.org>
 pkgname=exim
 pkgver=4.84
-pkgrel=1
+pkgrel=2
 pkgdesc="A Message Transfer Agent"
 url="http://www.exim.org/"
 arch="all"
 license="GPL2"
-depends=""
-depends_dev="db-dev pcre-dev openssl-dev libspf2-dev"
-makedepends="gawk $depends_dev"
+depends=
+depends_dev="db-dev pcre-dev openssl-dev libspf2-dev mysql-dev postgresql-dev sqlite-dev"
+makedepends="bash gawk perl $depends_dev"
 install=
-subpackages="$pkgname-doc"
+subpackages="$pkgname-cdb $pkgname-doc $pkgname-dnsdb $pkgname-passwd $pkgname-sqlite $pkgname-mysql $pkgname-postgresql $pkgname-utils $pkgname-scripts"
 source="ftp://exim.inode.at/exim/exim4/$pkgname-$pkgver.tar.bz2
 	exim.Makefile
 	exim.confd
 	exim.initd
 	exim.logrotate
-	aliases"
+	exim.pre-install"
 
-_builddir="$srcdir"/$pkgname-$pkgver
+_builddir=$srcdir/$pkgname-$pkgver
 
 prepare() {
-	cd "$_builddir"
+	cd $_builddir
 	# apply patches here
 	cp "$srcdir/$pkgname.Makefile" Local/Makefile
 	sed -e 's/^LIBS = -lnsl/LIBS =/g' \
_at_@ -31,71 +31,103 @@ prepare() {
 }
 
 build() {
-	cd "$_builddir"
-	# do not build parallel
-	export MAKEFLAGS=-j1
+	cd $_builddir
 	make makefile
-	make || {
-		cd build-Linux-*
-		sh ../scripts/Configure-config.h "make"
-	} && make || return 1
+	make -j1
 }
 
 package() {
-	cd "$_builddir"
-
-	install -D -m644 ../${pkgname}.logrotate ${pkgdir}/etc/logrotate.d/${pkgname}
-	install -D -m644 doc/exim.8 ${pkgdir}/usr/share/man/man8/exim.8
-	mkdir -p ${pkgdir}/var/spool/exim/db ${pkgdir}/etc/mail \
-		${pkgdir}/var/log/exim ${pkgdir}/usr/lib \
-		${pkgdir}/var/log/exim ${pkgdir}/usr/sbin \
-		${pkgdir}/var/spool/mail
-	chmod 770 ${pkgdir}/var/spool/exim ${pkgdir}/var/spool/exim/db
-	chmod 750 ${pkgdir}/var/log/exim ${pkgdir}/etc/mail
-	chmod 03775 ${pkgdir}/var/spool/mail
-	chown root:mail ${pkgdir}/var/spool/mail ${pkgdir}/etc/mail
-	chown mail:mail ${pkgdir}/var/log/exim
-	install -D -m644 src/configure.default ${pkgdir}/etc/mail/exim.conf
-	cd build-Linux-*
-	for i in exicyclog exim_checkaccess exim_dumpdb exim_lock\
-		exim_tidydb exipick exiqsumm exigrep exim_dbmbuild exim\
-		exim_fixdb eximstats exinext exiqgrep exiwhat; do
-		install -m 0755 "$i" "$pkgdir/usr/sbin"
+	cd $_builddir
+	make DESTDIR=$pkgdir INSTALL_ARG="-no_symlink -no_chown exim" install
+	install -D -m644 doc/exim.8 $pkgdir/usr/share/man/man8/exim.8
+	cd $pkgdir/usr/sbin
+	mv exim-${pkgver}-* exim
+	for i in mailq rmail rsmtp runq sendmail; do
+		ln -s exim $i
 	done
+	install -m644 -D $srcdir/$pkgname.logrotate $pkgdir/etc/logrotate.d/$pkgname
+	install -m644 -D $srcdir/$pkgname.confd $pkgdir/etc/conf.d/$pkgname
+	install -m755 -D $srcdir/$pkgname.initd $pkgdir/etc/init.d/$pkgname
+	install -m750 -D -g mail -d $pkgdir/usr/lib/exim
+	install -m750 -D -o mail -d $pkgdir/var/log/exim
+}
 
-	cd "$srcdir/exim-$pkgver/src"
-	sed -e "s|/etc/aliases|/etc/mail/aliases|g" \
-		-e "s|SYSTEM_ALIASES_FILE|/etc/mail/aliases|g" configure.default \
-		>"$pkgdir/etc/mail/exim.conf"
+scripts() {
+	pkgdesc="exim scripts"
+	depends="exim perl"
+	arch="noarch"
+	cd $_builddir
+	make	DESTDIR=$subpkgdir \
+		INSTALL_ARG="exicyclog exim_checkaccess eximstats exiqgrep exigrep exinext exiqsumm exipick exiwhat" \
+		install
+	rm -fr $subpkgdir/etc
+}
 
-	cp "$srcdir/aliases" "$pkgdir/etc/mail"
-	cd "$pkgdir/usr/sbin"
-	for i in mailq rmail rsmtp runq sendmail; do
-		ln -s exim "$i"
-	done
-	# fhs compliancy
-	ln -s ../sbin/exim ../lib/sendmail
+utils() {
+	pkgdesc="exim utils"
+	depends="exim"
+	cd $_builddir
+	make	DESTDIR=$subpkgdir \
+		INSTALL_ARG="exim_dbmbuild exim_dumpdb exim_tidydb exim_fixdb exim_lock" \
+		install
+	rm -fr $subpkgdir/etc
+}
+
+sqlite() {
+	pkgdesc="sqlite support for exim"
+	depends="exim"
+	_inst_lookup sqlite
+}
+
+mysql() {
+	pkgdesc="mysql support for exim"
+	depends="exim"
+	_inst_lookup mysql
+}
+
+postgresql() {
+	pkgdesc="postgresql support for exim"
+	depends="exim"
+	_inst_lookup pgsql
+}
+
+cdb() {
+	pkgdesc="cdb support for exim"
+	depends="exim"
+	_inst_lookup cdb
+}
+
+dnsdb() {
+	pkgdesc="dnsdb support for exim"
+	depends="exim"
+	_inst_lookup dnsdb
+}
+
+passwd() {
+	pkgdesc="passwd support for exim"
+	depends="exim"
+	_inst_lookup passwd
+}
 
-	# remove the 2 lines below (and this) if there is no init.d script
-	install -m755 -D "$srcdir"/$pkgname.initd "$pkgdir"/etc/init.d/$pkgname
-	install -m644 -D "$srcdir"/$pkgname.confd "$pkgdir"/etc/conf.d/$pkgname
+_inst_lookup() {
+	install -D -m755 $_builddir/build-Linux-*/lookups/$1.so $subpkgdir/usr/lib/exim/$1.so
 }
 
 md5sums="3d14522e604b687b9e515f5aa739b2c0  exim-4.84.tar.bz2
-90e01a407bfb32c406f5265d06c26ad7  exim.Makefile
+40806a330372bec5f0fc2cc1090a95d5  exim.Makefile
 f442b68d435598831bab8536ade071b8  exim.confd
 6ba3c29545484c152df7ac8656943891  exim.initd
 8e8003542b9b8cd6300e46c24c302802  exim.logrotate
-eaec7a2a5f49b768fa168415ef0105fb  aliases"
+a58ceadf9f3fa8b06bbadb01bc731dc8  exim.pre-install"
 sha256sums="78ea22be87fb6df880e7fd482f3bec9ef6ceca0c9dedd50f8a26cae0b38b9e9c  exim-4.84.tar.bz2
-0b6f24deea28bd236139dadef9632deb5255ac082bb9988dfac705d67034c92d  exim.Makefile
+aaf768ec8549963277d436c751e9bca6a061455273dfa8788b2939b500c42947  exim.Makefile
 668f912565a59926957090c6143f669f0e9de2cf441507d3c05fcd046865b401  exim.confd
 46869c47ff928c5628113e4a76ea469e8202339305b781ada0e37dcf6cd5bf76  exim.initd
 49b4d81d6823057c89f7734b2d76de389d427af56164faad32ec883f8ca9e804  exim.logrotate
-f2943990feb2ddfb93e8b0816ef914e7057cb5d48a093901881e970b1002ab8a  aliases"
+3470a7f2860b0c01549577edf446fc13cdcf3e10e1b52875eee666017227db03  exim.pre-install"
 sha512sums="3cd41af6d57e5f0377fc93367753eae6cb6bf835803e8608c44e1da5acefce1ed8886f4fe7536950de072bfed6e927afe1536c1e6466cf3121dd352b69a68039  exim-4.84.tar.bz2
-e6936db8316fbbd32ea9828137eaeeb2e84053252ce1c180015b99d70a9f8ad5a4dcbad565595e19c06a48498ee2df8e86b22efb6ca2bca64af13a4395a89f23  exim.Makefile
+43edf3a91eec84732985e87931a1de97a3118221a3007af77e1ac46d745752afea9d9c61117fd0618146cdec0a0b16f140fa824732ca455b7e37a7208de552ee  exim.Makefile
 24bae5bba1b41e59247cd7089c3f9ffcc5f4b26c3da1b21f755724a7ee5c99a05e324437c965ae86170056cc63b9bcdc41f624a747ab31b887d69cff620f2155  exim.confd
 aeec8762d1dce4b09049e08d0c275ae475e639c4a3ad667c4208df36eba71c544311f5c175d7f481ea84213cf130da0a77a0e32d3ff7e933a7356deab8c4e850  exim.initd
 665bfa5ced8829f8f199bbcd040c1c667193643c6d902e5412679cf138e4c8cda7ffd0eefc8ff3b76d95202ee52d0c372b7c319746ff590dd6b61b93c1a2fedf  exim.logrotate
-9cc0fe81b2110aecdd3d494650d051f773c2c83611692c4e5d365b89dcddd08b16af5b8f5f4ac3e3f553c36198846a05793d8fd01113f62d2ab761f555409201  aliases"
+6b6e85f392cd338602653b86f88daedf90a735e04f9bbcbac83df357ec881f436a74aedd91db21bd1e2e510eedea39587ae473efa7be9b75c6e2efe0472cf28d  exim.pre-install"
diff --git a/testing/exim/aliases b/testing/exim/aliases
deleted file mode 100644
index 3f76693..0000000
--- a/testing/exim/aliases
+++ /dev/null
_at_@ -1,35 +0,0 @@
-#
-#  /etc/mail/aliases
-#
-#  NOTE:  Make sure you run 'newaliases' after modifying this file
-#
-
-# Basic system aliases -- these MUST be present.
-MAILER-DAEMON:	postmaster
-postmaster:	root
-hostmaster:	root
-webmaster:	hostmaster
-ftpmaster:	hostmaster
-admin:		hostmaster
-administrator:	hostmaster
-
-# General redirections for pseudo accounts.
-bin:		root
-daemon:		root
-games:		root
-ingres:		root
-nobody:		root
-system:		root
-toor:		root
-uucp:		root
-
-# Well-known aliases.
-manager:	root
-dumper:		root
-operator:	root
-
-# trap decode to catch security attacks
-decode:		root
-
-# Person who should get root's mail
-#root:
diff --git a/testing/exim/exim.Makefile b/testing/exim/exim.Makefile
index 533b214..c2890c2 100644
--- a/testing/exim/exim.Makefile
+++ b/testing/exim/exim.Makefile
_at_@ -1,1227 +1,62 @@
-# $Cambridge: exim/src/src/EDITME,v 1.27 2010/06/12 15:21:25 jetmore Exp $
-
-##################################################
-#          The Exim mail transport agent         #
-##################################################
-
-# This is the template for Exim's main build-time configuration file. It
-# contains settings that are independent of any operating system. These are
-# things that are mostly sysadmin choices. The items below are divided into
-# those you must specify, those you probably want to specify, those you might
-# often want to specify, and those that you almost never need to mention.
-
-# Edit this file and save the result to a file called Local/Makefile within the
-# Exim distribution directory before running the "make" command.
-
-# Things that depend on the operating system have default settings in
-# OS/Makefile-Default, but these are overridden for some OS by files called
-# called OS/Makefile-<osname>. You can further override these by creating files
-# called Local/Makefile-<osname>, where "<osname>" stands for the name of your
-# operating system - look at the names in the OS directory to see which names
-# are recognized.
-
-# However, if you are building Exim for a single OS only, you don't need to
-# worry about setting up Local/Makefile-<osname>. Any build-time configuration
-# settings you require can in fact be placed in the one file called
-# Local/Makefile. It is only if you are building for several OS from the same
-# source files that you need to worry about splitting off your own OS-dependent
-# settings into separate files. (There's more explanation about how this all
-# works in the toplevel README file, under "Modifying the building process", as
-# well as in the Exim specification.)
-
-# One OS-specific thing that may need to be changed is the command for running
-# the C compiler; the overall default is gcc, but some OS Makefiles specify cc.
-# You can override anything that is set by putting CC=whatever in your
-# Local/Makefile.
-
-# NOTE: You should never need to edit any of the distributed Makefiles; all
-# overriding can be done in your Local/Makefile(s). This will make it easier
-# for you when the next release comes along.
-
-# The location of the X11 libraries is something else that is quite variable
-# even between different versions of the same operating system (and indeed
-# there are different versions of X11 as well, of course). The four settings
-# concerned here are X11, XINCLUDE, XLFLAGS (linking flags) and X11_LD_LIB
-# (dynamic run-time library). You need not worry about X11 unless you want to
-# compile the Exim monitor utility. Exim itself does not use X11.
-
-# Another area of variability between systems is the type and location of the
-# DBM library package. Exim has support for ndbm, gdbm, tdb, and Berkeley DB.
-# By default the code assumes ndbm; this often works with gdbm or DB, provided
-# they are correctly installed, via their compatibility interfaces. However,
-# Exim can also be configured to use the native calls for Berkeley DB (obsolete
-# versions 1.85, 2.x, 3.x, or the current 4.x version) and also for gdbm.
-
-# For some operating systems, a default DBM library (other than ndbm) is
-# selected by a setting in the OS-specific Makefile. Most modern OS now have
-# a DBM library installed as standard, and in many cases this will be selected
-# for you by the OS-specific configuration. If Exim compiles without any
-# problems, you probably do not have to worry about the DBM library. If you
-# do want or need to change it, you should first read the discussion in the
-# file doc/dbm.discuss.txt, which also contains instructions for testing Exim's
-# interface to the DBM library.
-
-# In Local/Makefiles blank lines and lines starting with # are ignored. It is
-# also permitted to use the # character to add a comment to a setting, for
-# example
-#
-# EXIM_GID=42   # the "mail" group
-#
-# However, with some versions of "make" this works only if there is no white
-# space between the end of the setting and the #, so perhaps it is best
-# avoided. A consequence of this facility is that it is not possible to have
-# the # character present in any setting, but I can't think of any cases where
-# this would be wanted.
-###############################################################################
-
-
-
-###############################################################################
-#                    THESE ARE THINGS YOU MUST SPECIFY                        #
-###############################################################################
-
-# Exim will not build unless you specify BIN_DIRECTORY, CONFIGURE_FILE, and
-# EXIM_USER. You also need EXIM_GROUP if EXIM_USER specifies a uid by number.
-
-# If you don't specify SPOOL_DIRECTORY, Exim won't fail to build. However, it
-# really is a very good idea to specify it here rather than at run time. This
-# is particularly true if you let the logs go to their default location in the
-# spool directory, because it means that the location of the logs is known
-# before Exim has read the run time configuration file.
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# BIN_DIRECTORY defines where the exim binary will be installed by "make
-# install". The path is also used internally by Exim when it needs to re-invoke
-# itself, either to send an error message, or to recover root privilege. Exim's
-# utility binaries and scripts are also installed in this directory. There is
-# no "standard" place for the binary directory. Some people like to keep all
-# the Exim files under one directory such as /usr/exim; others just let the
-# Exim binaries go into an existing directory such as /usr/sbin or
-# /usr/local/sbin. The installation script will try to create this directory,
-# and any superior directories, if they do not exist.
-
 BIN_DIRECTORY=/usr/sbin
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# CONFIGURE_FILE defines where Exim's run time configuration file is to be
-# found. It is the complete pathname for the file, not just a directory. The
-# location of all other run time files and directories can be changed in the
-# run time configuration file. There is a lot of variety in the choice of
-# location in different OS, and in the preferences of different sysadmins. Some
-# common locations are in /etc or /etc/mail or /usr/local/etc or
-# /usr/local/etc/mail. Another possibility is to keep all the Exim files under
-# a single directory such as /usr/exim. Whatever you choose, the installation
-# script will try to make the directory and any superior directories if they
-# don't exist. It will also install a default runtime configuration if this
-# file does not exist.
-
 CONFIGURE_FILE=/etc/mail/exim.conf
-
-# It is possible to specify a colon-separated list of files for CONFIGURE_FILE.
-# In this case, Exim will use the first of them that exists when it is run.
-# However, if a list is specified, the installation script no longer tries to
-# make superior directories or to install a default runtime configuration.
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# The Exim binary must normally be setuid root, so that it starts executing as
-# root, but (depending on the options with which it is called) it does not
-# always need to retain the root privilege. These settings define the user and
-# group that is used for Exim processes when they no longer need to be root. In
-# particular, this applies when receiving messages and when doing remote
-# deliveries. (Local deliveries run as various non-root users, typically as the
-# owner of a local mailbox.) Specifying these values as root is not supported.
-
 EXIM_USER=ref:mail
-
-# If you specify EXIM_USER as a name, this is looked up at build time, and the
-# uid number is built into the binary. However, you can specify that this
-# lookup is deferred until runtime. In this case, it is the name that is built
-# into the binary. You can do this by a setting of the form:
-
-# EXIM_USER=ref:exim
-
-# In other words, put "ref:" in front of the user name. If you set EXIM_USER
-# like this, any value specified for EXIM_GROUP is also passed "by reference".
-# Although this costs a bit of resource at runtime, it is convenient to use
-# this feature when building binaries that are to be run on multiple systems
-# where the name may refer to different uids. It also allows you to build Exim
-# on a system where there is no Exim user defined.
-
-# If the setting of EXIM_USER is numeric (e.g. EXIM_USER=42), there must
-# also be a setting of EXIM_GROUP. If, on the other hand, you use a name
-# for EXIM_USER (e.g. EXIM_USER=exim), you don't need to set EXIM_GROUP unless
-# you want to use a group other than the default group for the given user.
-
-# EXIM_GROUP=
-
-# Many sites define a user called "exim", with an appropriate default group,
-# and use
-#
-# EXIM_USER=exim
-#
-# while leaving EXIM_GROUP unspecified (commented out).
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# SPOOL_DIRECTORY defines the directory where all the data for messages in
-# transit is kept. It is strongly recommended that you define it here, though
-# it is possible to leave this till the run time configuration.
-
-# Exim creates the spool directory if it does not exist. The owner and group
-# will be those defined by EXIM_USER and EXIM_GROUP, and this also applies to
-# all the files and directories that are created in the spool directory.
-
-# Almost all installations choose this:
-
 SPOOL_DIRECTORY=/var/spool/exim
-
-
-
-###############################################################################
-#           THESE ARE THINGS YOU PROBABLY WANT TO SPECIFY                     #
-###############################################################################
-
-# If you need extra header file search paths on all compiles, put the -I
-# options in INCLUDE.  If you want the extra searches only for certain
-# parts of the build, see more specific xxx_INCLUDE variables below.
-
-# INCLUDE=-I/example/include
-
-# You need to specify some routers and transports if you want the Exim that you
-# are building to be capable of delivering mail. You almost certainly need at
-# least one type of lookup. You should consider whether you want to build
-# the Exim monitor or not.
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# These settings determine which individual router drivers are included in the
-# Exim binary. There are no defaults in the code; those routers that are wanted
-# must be defined here by setting the appropriate variables to the value "yes".
-# Including a router in the binary does not cause it to be used automatically.
-# It has also to be configured in the run time configuration file. By
-# commenting out those you know you don't want to use, you can make the binary
-# a bit smaller. If you are unsure, leave all of these included for now.
-
 ROUTER_ACCEPT=yes
 ROUTER_DNSLOOKUP=yes
 ROUTER_IPLITERAL=yes
 ROUTER_MANUALROUTE=yes
 ROUTER_QUERYPROGRAM=yes
 ROUTER_REDIRECT=yes
-
-# This one is very special-purpose, so is not included by default.
-
-# ROUTER_IPLOOKUP=yes
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# These settings determine which individual transport drivers are included in
-# the Exim binary. There are no defaults; those transports that are wanted must
-# be defined here by setting the appropriate variables to the value "yes".
-# Including a transport in the binary does not cause it to be used
-# automatically. It has also to be configured in the run time configuration
-# file. By commenting out those you know you don't want to use, you can make
-# the binary a bit smaller. If you are unsure, leave all of these included for
-# now.
-
 TRANSPORT_APPENDFILE=yes
 TRANSPORT_AUTOREPLY=yes
 TRANSPORT_PIPE=yes
 TRANSPORT_SMTP=yes
-
-# This one is special-purpose, and commonly not required, so it is not
-# included by default.
-
 TRANSPORT_LMTP=yes
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# The appendfile transport can write messages to local mailboxes in a number
-# of formats. The code for three specialist formats, maildir, mailstore, and
-# MBX, is included only when requested. If you do not know what this is about,
-# leave these settings commented out.
-
 SUPPORT_MAILDIR=yes
-# SUPPORT_MAILSTORE=yes
-# SUPPORT_MBX=yes
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# See below for dynamic lookup modules.
-# LOOKUP_MODULE_DIR=/usr/lib/exim/lookups/
-# If not using package management but using this anyway, then think about how
-# you perform upgrades and revert them. You should consider the benefit of
-# embedding the Exim version number into LOOKUP_MODULE_DIR, so that you can
-# maintain two concurrent sets of modules.
-
-# To build a module dynamically, you'll need to define CFLAGS_DYNAMIC for
-# your platform.  Eg:
-# CFLAGS_DYNAMIC=-shared -rdynamic
-# CFLAGS_DYNAMIC=-shared -rdynamic -fPIC
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# These settings determine which file and database lookup methods are included
-# in the binary. See the manual chapter entitled "File and database lookups"
-# for discussion. DBM and lsearch (linear search) are included by default. If
-# you are unsure about the others, leave them commented out for now.
-# LOOKUP_DNSDB does *not* refer to general mail routing using the DNS. It is
-# for the specialist case of using the DNS as a general database facility (not
-# common).
-# If set to "2" instead of "yes" then the corresponding lookup will be
-# built as a module and must be installed into LOOKUP_MODULE_DIR. You need to
-# add -export-dynamic -rdynamic to EXTRALIBS. You may also need to add -ldl to
-# EXTRALIBS so that dlopen() is available to Exim. You need to define
-# LOOKUP_MODULE_DIR above so the exim binary actually loads dynamic lookup
-# modules.
-# Also, instead of adding all the libraries/includes to LOOKUP_INCLUDE and
-# LOOKUP_LIBS, add them to the respective LOOKUP_*_INCLUDE and LOOKUP_*_LIBS
-# (where * is the name as given here in this list). That ensures that only
-# the dynamic library and not the exim binary will be linked against the
-# library.
-# NOTE: LDAP cannot be built as a module!
-
+LOOKUP_MODULE_DIR=/usr/lib/exim/
+CFLAGS_DYNAMIC=-shared -rdynamic -fPIC
 LOOKUP_DBM=yes
 LOOKUP_LSEARCH=yes
-LOOKUP_DNSDB=yes
-
-# LOOKUP_CDB=yes
+LOOKUP_DNSDB=2
+LOOKUP_CDB=2
 LOOKUP_DSEARCH=yes
-# LOOKUP_IBASE=yes
-# LOOKUP_LDAP=yes
-# LOOKUP_MYSQL=yes
-# LOOKUP_NIS=yes
-# LOOKUP_NISPLUS=yes
-# LOOKUP_ORACLE=yes
-# LOOKUP_PASSWD=yes
-# LOOKUP_PGSQL=yes
-# LOOKUP_SQLITE=yes
-# LOOKUP_WHOSON=yes
-
-# These two settings are obsolete; all three lookups are compiled when
-# LOOKUP_LSEARCH is enabled. However, we retain these for backward
-# compatibility. Setting one forces LOOKUP_LSEARCH if it is not set.
-
-# LOOKUP_WILDLSEARCH=yes
-# LOOKUP_NWILDLSEARCH=yes
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# If you have set LOOKUP_LDAP=yes, you should set LDAP_LIB_TYPE to indicate
-# which LDAP library you have. Unfortunately, though most of their functions
-# are the same, there are minor differences. Currently Exim knows about four
-# LDAP libraries: the one from the University of Michigan (also known as
-# OpenLDAP 1), OpenLDAP 2, the Netscape SDK library, and the library that comes
-# with Solaris 7 onwards. Uncomment whichever of these you are using.
-
-# LDAP_LIB_TYPE=OPENLDAP1
-# LDAP_LIB_TYPE=OPENLDAP2
-# LDAP_LIB_TYPE=NETSCAPE
-# LDAP_LIB_TYPE=SOLARIS
-
-# If you don't set any of these, Exim assumes the original University of
-# Michigan (OpenLDAP 1) library.
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# The PCRE library is required for exim.  There is no longer an embedded
-# version of the PCRE library included with the source code, instead you
-# must use a system library or build your own copy of PCRE.
-# In either case you must specify the library link info here.  If the
-# PCRE header files are not in the standard search path you must also
-# modify the INCLUDE path (above)
-# The default setting of PCRE_LIBS should work on the vast majority of
-# systems
-
+LOOKUP_MYSQL=2
+LOOKUP_MYSQL_INCLUDE=-I/usr/include/mysql
+LOOKUP_MYSQL_LIBS=-lmysqlclient
+LOOKUP_PASSWD=2
+LOOKUP_PGSQL=2
+LOOKUP_PGSQL_INCLUDE=-I/usr/include/postgresql
+LOOKUP_PGSQL_LIBS=-lpq
+LOOKUP_SQLITE=2
+LOOKUP_SQLITE_LIBS=-lsqlite3
+LOOKUP_SPF=2
+LOOKUP_SPF_LIBS=-lspf2
+#LOOKUP_WHOSON=2
 PCRE_LIBS=-lpcre
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Additional libraries and include directories may be required for some
-# lookup styles (e.g. LDAP, MYSQL or PGSQL). LOOKUP_LIBS is included only on
-# the command for linking Exim itself, not on any auxiliary programs. You
-# don't need to set LOOKUP_INCLUDE if the relevant directories are already
-# specified in INCLUDE. The settings below are just examples; -lpq is for
-# PostgreSQL, -lgds is for Interbase, -lsqlite3 is for SQLite.
-
-# LOOKUP_INCLUDE=-I /usr/local/ldap/include -I /usr/local/mysql/include -I /usr/local/pgsql/include
-# LOOKUP_LIBS=-L/usr/local/lib -lldap -llber -lmysqlclient -lpq -lgds -lsqlite3
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Compiling the Exim monitor: If you want to compile the Exim monitor, a
-# program that requires an X11 display, then EXIM_MONITOR should be set to the
-# value "eximon.bin". Comment out this setting to disable compilation of the
-# monitor. The locations of various X11 directories for libraries and include
-# files are defaulted in the OS/Makefile-Default file, but can be overridden in
-# local OS-specific make files.
-
-
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Compiling Exim with content scanning support: If you want to compile Exim
-# with support for message body content scanning, set WITH_CONTENT_SCAN to
-# the value "yes". This will give you malware and spam scanning in the DATA ACL,
-# and the MIME ACL. Please read the documentation to learn more about these
-# features.
-
 WITH_CONTENT_SCAN=yes
-
-# If you want to use the deprecated "demime" condition in the DATA ACL,
-# uncomment the line below. Doing so will also explicitly turn on the
-# WITH_CONTENT_SCAN option. If possible, use the MIME ACL instead of
-# the "demime" condition.
-
 WITH_OLD_DEMIME=yes
-
-# If you're using ClamAV and are backporting fixes to an old version, instead
-# of staying current (which is the more usual approach) then you may need to
-# use an older API which uses a STREAM command, now deprecated, instead of
-# zINSTREAM.  If you need to set this, please let the Exim developers know, as
-# if nobody reports a need for it, we'll remove this option and clean up the
-# code.  zINSTREAM was introduced with ClamAV 0.95.
-#
-# WITH_OLD_CLAMAV_STREAM=yes
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# By default Exim includes code to support DKIM (DomainKeys Identified
-# Mail, RFC4871) signing and verification.  Verification of signatures is
-# turned on by default.  See the spec for information on conditionally
-# disabling it.  To disable the inclusion of the entire feature, set
-# DISABLE_DKIM to "yes"
-
-# DISABLE_DKIM=yes
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Compiling Exim with experimental features. These are documented in
-# experimental-spec.txt. "Experimental" means that the way these features are
-# implemented may still change. Backward compatibility is not guaranteed.
-
-# Uncomment the following lines to add SPF support. You need to have libspf2
-# installed on your system (www.libspf2.org). Depending on where it is installed
-# you may have to edit the CFLAGS and LDFLAGS lines.
-
 EXPERIMENTAL_SPF=yes
-CFLAGS  += -I/usr/local/include
-LDFLAGS += -lspf2
-
-# Uncomment the following lines to add SRS (Sender rewriting scheme) support.
-# You need to have libsrs_alt installed on your system (srs.mirtol.com).
-# Depending on where it is installed you may have to edit the CFLAGS and
-# LDFLAGS lines.
-
-# EXPERIMENTAL_SRS=yes
-# CFLAGS  += -I/usr/local/include
-# LDFLAGS += -lsrs_alt
-
-# Uncomment the following lines to add Brightmail AntiSpam support. You need
-# to have the Brightmail client SDK installed. Please check the experimental
-# documentation for implementation details. You need to edit the CFLAGS and
-# LDFLAGS lines.
-
-# EXPERIMENTAL_BRIGHTMAIL=yes
-# CFLAGS  += -I/opt/brightmail/bsdk-6.0/include
-# LDFLAGS += -lxml2_single -lbmiclient_single -L/opt/brightmail/bsdk-6.0/lib
-
-
-
-###############################################################################
-#                 THESE ARE THINGS YOU MIGHT WANT TO SPECIFY                  #
-###############################################################################
-
-# The items in this section are those that are commonly changed according to
-# the sysadmin's preferences, but whose defaults are often acceptable. The
-# first five are concerned with security issues, where differing levels of
-# paranoia are appropriate in different environments. Sysadmins also vary in
-# their views on appropriate levels of defence in these areas. If you do not
-# understand these issues, go with the defaults, which are used by many sites.
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Although Exim is normally a setuid program, owned by root, it refuses to run
-# local deliveries as root by default. There is a runtime option called
-# "never_users" which lists the users that must never be used for local
-# deliveries. There is also the setting below, which provides a list that
-# cannot be overridden at runtime. This guards against problems caused by
-# unauthorized changes to the runtime configuration. You are advised not to
-# remove "root" from this option, but you can add other users if you want. The
-# list is colon-separated. It must NOT contain any spaces.
-
-# FIXED_NEVER_USERS=root:bin:daemon
 FIXED_NEVER_USERS=root
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# By default, Exim insists that its configuration file be owned by root. You
-# can specify one additional permitted owner here.
-
-# CONFIGURE_OWNER=
-
-# If the configuration file is group-writeable, Exim insists by default that it
-# is owned by root. You can specify one additional permitted group owner here.
-
-# CONFIGURE_GROUP=
-
-# If you specify CONFIGURE_OWNER or CONFIGURE_GROUP as a name, this is looked
-# up at build time, and the uid or gid number is built into the binary.
-# However, you can specify that the lookup is deferred until runtime. In this
-# case, it is the name that is built into the binary. You can do this by a
-# setting of the form:
-
-# CONFIGURE_OWNER=ref:mail
-# CONFIGURE_GROUP=ref:sysadmin
-
-# In other words, put "ref:" in front of the user or group name. Although this
-# costs a bit of resource at runtime, it is convenient to use this feature when
-# building binaries that are to be run on multiple systems where the names may
-# refer to different uids or gids. It also allows you to build Exim on a system
-# where the relevant user or group is not defined.
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# The -C option allows Exim to be run with an alternate runtime configuration
-# file. When this is used by root, root privilege is retained by the binary
-# (for any other caller including the Exim user, it is dropped). You can
-# restrict the location of alternate configurations by defining a prefix below.
-# Any file used with -C must then start with this prefix (except that /dev/null
-# is also permitted if the caller is root, because that is used in the install
-# script). If the prefix specifies a directory that is owned by root, a
-# compromise of the Exim account does not permit arbitrary alternate
-# configurations to be used. The prefix can be more restrictive than just a
-# directory (the second example).
-
-# ALT_CONFIG_PREFIX=/some/directory/
-# ALT_CONFIG_PREFIX=/some/directory/exim.conf-
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# When a user other than root uses the -C option to override the configuration
-# file (including the Exim user when re-executing Exim to regain root
-# privileges for local message delivery), this will normally cause Exim to
-# drop root privileges. The TRUSTED_CONFIG_LIST option, specifies a file which
-# contains a list of trusted configuration filenames, one per line. If the -C
-# option is used by the Exim user or by the user specified in the
-# CONFIGURE_OWNER setting, to specify a configuration file which is listed in
-# the TRUSTED_CONFIG_LIST file, then root privileges are not dropped by Exim.
-
-# TRUSTED_CONFIG_LIST=/usr/exim/trusted_configs
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Uncommenting this option disables the use of the -D command line option,
-# which changes the values of macros in the runtime configuration file.
-# This is another protection against somebody breaking into the Exim account.
-
-# DISABLE_D_OPTION=yes
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# By contrast, you might be maintaining a system which relies upon the ability
-# to override values with -D and assumes that these will be passed through to
-# the delivery processes.  As of Exim 4.73, this is no longer the case by
-# default.  Going forward, we strongly recommend that you use a shim Exim
-# configuration file owned by root stored under TRUSTED_CONFIG_LIST.
-# That shim can set macros before .include'ing your main configuration file.
-#
-# As a strictly transient measure to ease migration to 4.73, the
-# WHITELIST_D_MACROS value definies a colon-separated list of macro-names
-# which are permitted to be overridden from the command-line which will be
-# honoured by the Exim user.  So these are macros that can persist to delivery
-# time.
-# Examples might be -DTLS or -DSPOOL=/some/dir.  The values on the
-# command-line are filtered to only permit: [A-Za-z0-9_/.-]*
-#
-# This option is highly likely to be removed in a future release.  It exists
-# only to make 4.73 as easy as possible to migrate to.  If you use it, we
-# encourage you to schedule time to rework your configuration to not depend
-# upon it.  Most people should not need to use this.
-#
-# By default, no macros are whitelisted for -D usage.
-
-# WHITELIST_D_MACROS=TLS:SPOOL
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Exim has support for the AUTH (authentication) extension of the SMTP
-# protocol, as defined by RFC 2554. If you don't know what SMTP authentication
-# is, you probably won't want to include this code, so you should leave these
-# settings commented out. If you do want to make use of SMTP authentication,
-# you must uncomment at least one of the following, so that appropriate code is
-# included in the Exim binary. You will then need to set up the run time
-# configuration to make use of the mechanism(s) selected.
-
 AUTH_CRAM_MD5=yes
-# AUTH_CYRUS_SASL=yes
 AUTH_DOVECOT=yes
 AUTH_PLAINTEXT=yes
 AUTH_SPA=yes
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# If you specified AUTH_CYRUS_SASL above, you should ensure that you have the
-# Cyrus SASL library installed before trying to build Exim, and you probably
-# want to uncomment the following line:
-
-# AUTH_LIBS=-lsasl2
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# When Exim is decoding MIME "words" in header lines, most commonly for use
-# in the $header_xxx expansion, it converts any foreign character sets to the
-# one that is set in the headers_charset option. The default setting is
-# defined by this setting:
-
 HEADERS_CHARSET="ISO-8859-1"
-
-# If you are going to make use of $header_xxx expansions in your configuration
-# file, or if your users are going to use them in filter files, and the normal
-# character set on your host is something other than ISO-8859-1, you might
-# like to specify a different default here. This value can be overridden in
-# the runtime configuration, and it can also be overridden in individual filter
-# files.
-#
-# IMPORTANT NOTE: The iconv() function is needed for character code
-# conversions. Please see the next item...
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Character code conversions are possible only if the iconv() function is
-# installed on your operating system. There are two places in Exim where this
-# is relevant: (a) The $header_xxx expansion (see the previous item), and (b)
-# the Sieve filter support. For those OS where iconv() is known to be installed
-# as standard, the file in OS/Makefile-xxxx contains
-#
-# HAVE_ICONV=yes
-#
-# If you are not using one of those systems, but have installed iconv(), you
-# need to uncomment that line above. In some cases, you may find that iconv()
-# and its header file are not in the default places. You might need to use
-# something like this:
-#
-# HAVE_ICONV=yes
-# CFLAGS=-O -I/usr/local/include
-# EXTRALIBS_EXIM=-L/usr/local/lib -liconv
-#
-# but of course there may need to be other things in CFLAGS and EXTRALIBS_EXIM
-# as well.
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# The passwords for user accounts are normally encrypted with the crypt()
-# function. Comparisons with encrypted passwords can be done using Exim's
-# "crypteq" expansion operator. (This is commonly used as part of the
-# configuration of an authenticator for use with SMTP AUTH.) At least one
-# operating system has an extended function called crypt16(), which uses up to
-# 16 characters of a password (the normal crypt() uses only the first 8). Exim
-# supports the use of crypt16() as well as crypt() but note the warning below.
-
-# You can always indicate a crypt16-encrypted password by preceding it with
-# "{crypt16}". If you want the default handling (without any preceding
-# indicator) to use crypt16(), uncomment the following line:
-
-# DEFAULT_CRYPT=crypt16
-
-# If you do that, you can still access the basic crypt() function by preceding
-# an encrypted password with "{crypt}". For more details, see the description
-# of the "crypteq" condition in the manual chapter on string expansions.
-
-# Some operating systems do not include a crypt16() function, so Exim has one
-# of its own, which it uses unless HAVE_CRYPT16 is defined. Normally, that will
-# be set in an OS-specific Makefile for the OS that have such a function, so
-# you should not need to bother with it.
-
-# *** WARNING *** WARNING *** WARNING *** WARNING *** WARNING ***
-# It turns out that the above is not entirely accurate. As well as crypt16()
-# there is a function called bigcrypt() that some operating systems have. This
-# may or may not use the same algorithm, and both of them may be different to
-# Exim's built-in crypt16() that is used unless HAVE_CRYPT16 is defined.
-#
-# However, since there is now a move away from the traditional crypt()
-# functions towards using SHA1 and other algorithms, tidying up this area of
-# Exim is seen as very low priority. In practice, if you need to, you can
-# define DEFAULT_CRYPT to the name of any function that has the same interface
-# as the traditional crypt() function.
-# *** WARNING *** WARNING *** WARNING *** WARNING *** WARNING ***
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Exim can be built to support the SMTP STARTTLS command, which implements
-# Transport Layer Security using SSL (Secure Sockets Layer). To do this, you
-# must install the OpenSSL library package or the GnuTLS library. Exim contains
-# no cryptographic code of its own. Uncomment the following lines if you want
-# to build Exim with TLS support. If you don't know what this is all about,
-# leave these settings commented out.
-
-# This setting is required for any TLS support (either OpenSSL or GnuTLS)
+EXTRALIBS_EXIM=-export-dynamic -rdynamic -ldl 
 SUPPORT_TLS=yes
-
-# Uncomment this setting if you are using OpenSSL
 TLS_LIBS=-lssl -lcrypto
-
-# Uncomment these settings if you are using GnuTLS
-# USE_GNUTLS=yes
-# TLS_LIBS=-lgnutls -ltasn1 -lgcrypt
-
-# If you are running Exim as a server, note that just building it with TLS
-# support is not all you need to do. You also need to set up a suitable
-# certificate, and tell Exim about it by means of the tls_certificate
-# and tls_privatekey run time options. You also need to set tls_advertise_hosts
-# to specify the hosts to which Exim advertises TLS support. On the other hand,
-# if you are running Exim only as a client, building it with TLS support
-# is all you need to do.
-
-# Additional libraries and include files are required for both OpenSSL and
-# GnuTLS. The TLS_LIBS settings above assume that the libraries are installed
-# with all your other libraries. If they are in a special directory, you may
-# need something like
-
-# TLS_LIBS=-L/usr/local/openssl/lib -lssl -lcrypto
-# or
-# TLS_LIBS=-L/opt/gnu/lib -lgnutls -ltasn1 -lgcrypt
-
-# TLS_LIBS is included only on the command for linking Exim itself, not on any
-# auxiliary programs. If the include files are not in a standard place, you can
-# set TLS_INCLUDE to specify where they are, for example:
-
-# TLS_INCLUDE=-I/usr/local/openssl/include/
-# or
-# TLS_INCLUDE=-I/opt/gnu/include
-
-# You don't need to set TLS_INCLUDE if the relevant directories are already
-# specified in INCLUDE.
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# The default distribution of Exim contains only the plain text form of the
-# documentation. Other forms are available separately. If you want to install
-# the documentation in "info" format, first fetch the Texinfo documentation
-# sources from the ftp directory and unpack them, which should create files
-# with the extension "texinfo" in the doc directory. You may find that the
-# version number of the texinfo files is different to your Exim version number,
-# because the main documentation isn't updated as often as the code. For
-# example, if you have Exim version 4.43, the source tarball upacks into a
-# directory called exim-4.43, but the texinfo tarball unpacks into exim-4.40.
-# In this case, move the contents of exim-4.40/doc into exim-4.43/doc after you
-# have unpacked them. Then set INFO_DIRECTORY to the location of your info
-# directory. This varies from system to system, but is often /usr/share/info.
-# Once you have done this, "make install" will build the info files and
-# install them in the directory you have defined.
-
-# INFO_DIRECTORY=/usr/share/info
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Exim log directory and files: Exim creates several log files inside a
-# single log directory. You can define the directory and the form of the
-# log file name here. If you do not set anything, Exim creates a directory
-# called "log" inside its spool directory (see SPOOL_DIRECTORY above) and uses
-# the filenames "mainlog", "paniclog", and "rejectlog". If you want to change
-# this, you can set LOG_FILE_PATH to a path name containing one occurrence of
-# %s. This will be replaced by one of the strings "main", "panic", or "reject"
-# to form the final file names. Some installations may want something like this:
-
-LOG_FILE_PATH=/var/log/exim/%slog
-
-# which results in files with names /var/log/exim_mainlog, etc. The directory
-# in which the log files are placed must exist; Exim does not try to create
-# it for itself. It is also your responsibility to ensure that Exim is capable
-# of writing files using this path name. The Exim user (see EXIM_USER above)
-# must be able to create and update files in the directory you have specified.
-
-# You can also configure Exim to use syslog, instead of or as well as log
-# files, by settings such as these
-
-# LOG_FILE_PATH=syslog
-# LOG_FILE_PATH=syslog:/var/log/exim_%slog
-
-# The first of these uses only syslog; the second uses syslog and also writes
-# to log files. Do not include white space in such a setting as it messes up
-# the building process.
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# When logging to syslog, the following option caters for syslog replacements
-# that are able to accept log entries longer than the 1024 characters allowed
-# by RFC 3164. It is up to you to make sure your syslog daemon can handle this.
-# Non-printable characters are usually unacceptable regardless, so log entries
-# are still split on newline characters.
-
-# SYSLOG_LONG_LINES=yes
-
-# If you are not interested in the process identifier (pid) of the Exim that is
-# making the call to syslog, then comment out the following line.
-
-SYSLOG_LOG_PID=yes
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Cycling log files: this variable specifies the maximum number of old
-# log files that are kept by the exicyclog log-cycling script. You don't have
-# to use exicyclog. If your operating system has other ways of cycling log
-# files, you can use them instead. The exicyclog script isn't run by default;
-# you have to set up a cron job for it if you want it.
-
+LOG_FILE_PATH=syslog:/var/log/exim/%slog
+SYSLOG_LOG_PID=no
 EXICYCLOG_MAX=10
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# The compress command is used by the exicyclog script to compress old log
-# files. Both the name of the command and the suffix that it adds to files
-# need to be defined here. See also the EXICYCLOG_MAX configuration.
-
 COMPRESS_COMMAND=/bin/gzip
 COMPRESS_SUFFIX=gz
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# If the exigrep utility is fed compressed log files, it tries to uncompress
-# them using this command.
-
 ZCAT_COMMAND=/bin/zcat
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Compiling in support for embedded Perl: If you want to be able to
-# use Perl code in Exim's string manipulation language and you have Perl
-# (version 5.004 or later) installed, set EXIM_PERL to perl.o. Using embedded
-# Perl costs quite a lot of resources. Only do this if you really need it.
-
-# EXIM_PERL=perl.o
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Support for dynamically-loaded string expansion functions via ${dlfunc. If
-# you are using gcc the dynamically-loaded object must be compiled with the
-# -shared option, and you will need to add -export-dynamic to EXTRALIBS so
-# that the local_scan API is made available by the linker. You may also need
-# to add -ldl to EXTRALIBS so that dlopen() is available to Exim.
-
-# EXPAND_DLFUNC=yes
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Exim has support for PAM (Pluggable Authentication Modules), a facility
-# which is available in the latest releases of Solaris and in some GNU/Linux
-# distributions (see http://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/libs/pam/). The Exim
-# support, which is intended for use in conjunction with the SMTP AUTH
-# facilities, is included only when requested by the following setting:
-
-# SUPPORT_PAM=yes
-
-# You probably need to add -lpam to EXTRALIBS, and in some releases of
-# GNU/Linux -ldl is also needed.
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Support for authentication via Radius is also available. The Exim support,
-# which is intended for use in conjunction with the SMTP AUTH facilities,
-# is included only when requested by setting the following parameter to the
-# location of your Radius configuration file:
-
-# RADIUS_CONFIG_FILE=/etc/radiusclient/radiusclient.conf
-# RADIUS_CONFIG_FILE=/etc/radius.conf
-
-# If you have set RADIUS_CONFIG_FILE, you should also set one of these to
-# indicate which RADIUS library is used:
-
-# RADIUS_LIB_TYPE=RADIUSCLIENT
-# RADIUS_LIB_TYPE=RADIUSCLIENTNEW
-# RADIUS_LIB_TYPE=RADLIB
-
-# RADIUSCLIENT is the radiusclient library; you probably need to add
-#   -lradiusclient to EXTRALIBS.
-#
-# The API for the radiusclient library was changed at release 0.4.0.
-# Unfortunately, the header file does not define a version number that clients
-# can use to support both the old and new APIs. If you are using version 0.4.0
-# or later of the radiusclient library, you should use RADIUSCLIENTNEW.
-#
-# RADLIB is the Radius library that comes with FreeBSD (the header file is
-#   called radlib.h); you probably need to add -lradius to EXTRALIBS.
-#
-# If you do not set RADIUS_LIB_TYPE, Exim assumes the radiusclient library,
-# using the original API.
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Support for authentication via the Cyrus SASL pwcheck daemon is available.
-# Note, however, that pwcheck is now deprecated in favour of saslauthd (see
-# next item). The Exim support for pwcheck, which is intented for use in
-# conjunction with the SMTP AUTH facilities, is included only when requested by
-# setting the following parameter to the location of the pwcheck daemon's
-# socket.
-#
-# There is no need to install all of SASL on your system. You just need to run
-# ./configure --with-pwcheck, cd to the pwcheck directory within the sources,
-# make and make install. You must create the socket directory (default
-# /var/pwcheck) and chown it to exim's user and group. Once you have installed
-# pwcheck, you should arrange for it to be started by root at boot time.
-
-# CYRUS_PWCHECK_SOCKET=/var/pwcheck/pwcheck
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Support for authentication via the Cyrus SASL saslauthd daemon is available.
-# The Exim support, which is intented for use in conjunction with the SMTP AUTH
-# facilities, is included only when requested by setting the following
-# parameter to the location of the saslauthd daemon's socket.
-#
-# There is no need to install all of SASL on your system. You just need to run
-# ./configure --with-saslauthd (and any other options you need, for example, to
-# select or deselect authentication mechanisms), cd to the saslauthd directory
-# within the sources, make and make install. You must create the socket
-# directory (default /var/state/saslauthd) and chown it to exim's user and
-# group. Once you have installed saslauthd, you should arrange for it to be
-# started by root at boot time.
-
-# CYRUS_SASLAUTHD_SOCKET=/var/state/saslauthd/mux
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# TCP wrappers: If you want to use tcpwrappers from within Exim, uncomment
-# this setting. See the manual section entitled "Use of tcpwrappers" in the
-# chapter on building and installing Exim.
-#
-# USE_TCP_WRAPPERS=yes
-#
-# You may well also have to specify a local "include" file and an additional
-# library for TCP wrappers, so you probably need something like this:
-#
-# USE_TCP_WRAPPERS=yes
-# CFLAGS=-O -I/usr/local/include
-# EXTRALIBS_EXIM=-L/usr/local/lib -lwrap
-#
-# but of course there may need to be other things in CFLAGS and EXTRALIBS_EXIM
-# as well.
-#
-# To use a name other than exim in the tcpwrappers config file,
-# e.g. if you're running multiple daemons with different access lists,
-# or multiple MTAs with the same access list, define
-# TCP_WRAPPERS_DAEMON_NAME accordingly
-#
-# TCP_WRAPPERS_DAEMON_NAME="exim"
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# The default action of the exim_install script (which is run by "make
-# install") is to install the Exim binary with a unique name such as
-# exim-4.43-1, and then set up a symbolic link called "exim" to reference it,
-# moving the symbolic link from any previous version. If you define NO_SYMLINK
-# (the value doesn't matter), the symbolic link is not created or moved. You
-# will then have to "turn Exim on" by setting up the link manually.
-
-# NO_SYMLINK=yes
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Another default action of the install script is to install a default runtime
-# configuration file if one does not exist. This configuration has a router for
-# expanding system aliases. The default assumes that these aliases are kept
-# in the traditional file called /etc/aliases. If such a file does not exist,
-# the installation script creates one that contains just comments (no actual
-# aliases). The following setting can be changed to specify a different
-# location for the system alias file.
-
+EXPAND_DLFUNC=yes
+NO_SYMLINK=yes
 SYSTEM_ALIASES_FILE=/etc/mail/aliases
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# There are some testing options (-be, -bt, -bv) that read data from the
-# standard input when no arguments are supplied. By default, the input lines
-# are read using the standard fgets() function. This does not support line
-# editing during interactive input (though the terminal's "erase" character
-# works as normal). If your operating system has the readline() function, and
-# in addition supports dynamic loading of library functions, you can cause
-# Exim to use readline() for the -be testing option (only) by uncommenting the
-# following setting. Dynamic loading is used so that the library is loaded only
-# when the -be testing option is given; by the time the loading occurs,
-# Exim has given up its root privilege and is running as the calling user. This
-# is the reason why readline() is NOT supported for -bt and -bv, because Exim
-# runs as root or as exim, respectively, for those options. When USE_READLINE
-# is "yes", as well as supporting line editing, a history of input lines in the
-# current run is maintained.
-
-# USE_READLINE=yes
-
-# You may need to add -ldl to EXTRALIBS when you set USE_READLINE=yes.
-# Note that this option adds to the size of the Exim binary, because the
-# dynamic loading library is not otherwise included.
-
-
-
-###############################################################################
-#              THINGS YOU ALMOST NEVER NEED TO MENTION                        #
-###############################################################################
-
-# The settings in this section are available for use in special circumstances.
-# In the vast majority of installations you need not change anything below.
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# The following commands live in different places in some OS. Either the
-# ultimate default settings, or the OS-specific files should already point to
-# the right place, but they can be overridden here if necessary. These settings
-# are used when building various scripts to ensure that the correct paths are
-# used when the scripts are run. They are not used in the Makefile itself. Perl
-# is not necessary for running Exim unless you set EXIM_PERL (see above) to get
-# it embedded, but there are some utilities that are Perl scripts. If you
-# haven't got Perl, Exim will still build and run; you just won't be able to
-# use those utilities.
-
-# CHOWN_COMMAND=/usr/bin/chown
-# CHGRP_COMMAND=/usr/bin/chgrp
-# CHMOD_COMMAND=/usr/bin/chmod
-# MV_COMMAND=/bin/mv
-# RM_COMMAND=/bin/rm
-# TOUCH_COMMAND=/usr/bin/touch
-# PERL_COMMAND=/usr/bin/perl
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# The following macro can be used to change the command for building a library
-# of functions. By default the "ar" command is used, with options "cq".
-# Only in rare circumstances should you need to change this.
-
-# AR=ar cq
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# In some operating systems, the value of the TMPDIR environment variable
-# controls where temporary files are created. Exim does not make use of
-# temporary files, except when delivering to MBX mailboxes. However, if Exim
-# calls any external libraries (e.g. DBM libraries), they may use temporary
-# files, and thus be influenced by the value of TMPDIR. For this reason, when
-# Exim starts, it checks the environment for TMPDIR, and if it finds it is set,
-# it replaces the value with what is defined here. Commenting this setting
-# suppresses the check altogether.
-
 TMPDIR="/tmp"
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# The following macros can be used to change the default modes that are used
-# by the appendfile transport. In most installations the defaults are just
-# fine, and in any case, you can change particular instances of the transport
-# at run time if you want.
-
-# APPENDFILE_MODE=0600
-# APPENDFILE_DIRECTORY_MODE=0700
-# APPENDFILE_LOCKFILE_MODE=0600
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# In some installations there may be multiple machines sharing file systems,
-# where a different configuration file is required for Exim on the different
-# machines. If CONFIGURE_FILE_USE_NODE is defined, then Exim will first look
-# for a configuration file whose name is that defined by CONFIGURE_FILE,
-# with the node name obtained by uname() tacked on the end, separated by a
-# period (for example, /usr/exim/configure.host.in.some.domain). If this file
-# does not exist, then the bare configuration file name is tried.
-
-# CONFIGURE_FILE_USE_NODE=yes
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# In some esoteric configurations two different versions of Exim are run,
-# with different setuid values, and different configuration files are required
-# to handle the different cases. If CONFIGURE_FILE_USE_EUID is defined, then
-# Exim will first look for a configuration file whose name is that defined
-# by CONFIGURE_FILE, with the effective uid tacked on the end, separated by
-# a period (for eximple, /usr/exim/configure.0). If this file does not exist,
-# then the bare configuration file name is tried. In the case when both
-# CONFIGURE_FILE_USE_EUID and CONFIGURE_FILE_USE_NODE are set, four files
-# are tried: <name>.<euid>.<node>, <name>.<node>, <name>.<euid>, and <name>.
-
-# CONFIGURE_FILE_USE_EUID=yes
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# The size of the delivery buffers: These specify the sizes (in bytes) of
-# the buffers that are used when copying a message from the spool to a
-# destination. There is rarely any need to change these values.
-
-# DELIVER_IN_BUFFER_SIZE=8192
-# DELIVER_OUT_BUFFER_SIZE=8192
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# The mode of the database directory: Exim creates a directory called "db"
-# in its spool directory, to hold its databases of hints. This variable
-# determines the mode of the created directory. The default value in the
-# source is 0750.
-
-# EXIMDB_DIRECTORY_MODE=0750
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Database file mode: The mode of files created in the "db" directory defaults
-# to 0640 in the source, and can be changed here.
-
-# EXIMDB_MODE=0640
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Database lock file mode: The mode of zero-length files created in the "db"
-# directory to use for locking purposes defaults to 0640 in the source, and
-# can be changed here.
-
-# EXIMDB_LOCKFILE_MODE=0640
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# This parameter sets the maximum length of the header portion of a message
-# that Exim is prepared to process. The default setting is one megabyte. The
-# limit exists in order to catch rogue mailers that might connect to your SMTP
-# port, start off a header line, and then just pump junk at it for ever. The
-# message_size_limit option would also catch this, but it may not be set.
-# The value set here is the default; it can be changed at runtime.
-
-# HEADER_MAXSIZE="(1024*1024)"
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# The mode of the input directory: The input directory is where messages are
-# kept while awaiting delivery. Exim creates it if necessary, using a mode
-# which can be defined here (default 0750).
-
-# INPUT_DIRECTORY_MODE=0750
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# The mode of Exim's log directory, when it is created by Exim inside the spool
-# directory, defaults to 0750 but can be changed here.
-
-# LOG_DIRECTORY_MODE=0750
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# The log files themselves are created as required, with a mode that defaults
-# to 0640, but which can be changed here.
-
-# LOG_MODE=0640
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# The TESTDB lookup is for performing tests on the handling of lookup results,
-# and is not useful for general running. It should be included only when
-# debugging the code of Exim.
-
-# LOOKUP_TESTDB=yes
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# /bin/sh is used by default as the shell in which to run commands that are
-# defined in the makefiles. This can be changed if necessary, by uncommenting
-# this line and specifying another shell, but note that a Bourne-compatible
-# shell is expected.
-
-# MAKE_SHELL=/bin/sh
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# The maximum number of named lists of each type (address, domain, host, and
-# local part) can be increased by changing this value. It should be set to
-# a multiple of 16.
-
+MAKE_SHELL=/bin/bash
 MAX_NAMED_LIST=16
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Network interfaces: Unless you set the local_interfaces option in the runtime
-# configuration file to restrict Exim to certain interfaces only, it will run
-# code to find all the interfaces there are on your host. Unfortunately,
-# the call to the OS that does this requires a buffer large enough to hold
-# data for all the interfaces - it was designed in the days when a host rarely
-# had more than three or four interfaces. Nowadays hosts can have very many
-# virtual interfaces running on the same hardware. If you have more than 250
-# virtual interfaces, you will need to uncomment this setting and increase the
-# value.
-
-# MAXINTERFACES=250
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Per-message logs: While a message is in the process of being delivered,
-# comments on its progress are written to a message log, for the benefit of
-# human administrators. These logs are held in a directory called "msglog"
-# in the spool directory. Its mode defaults to 0750, but can be changed here.
-# The message log directory is also used for storing files that are used by
-# transports for returning data to a message's sender (see the "return_output"
-# option for transports).
-
-# MSGLOG_DIRECTORY_MODE=0750
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# There are three options which are used when compiling the Perl interface and
-# when linking with Perl. The default values for these are placed automatically
-# at the head of the Makefile by the script which builds it. However, if you
-# want to override them, you can do so here.
-
-# PERL_CC=
-# PERL_CCOPTS=
-# PERL_LIBS=
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Identifying the daemon: When an Exim daemon starts up, it writes its pid
-# (process id) to a file so that it can easily be identified. The path of the
-# file can be specified here. Some installations may want something like this:
-
 PID_FILE_PATH=/var/run/exim.pid
-
-# If PID_FILE_PATH is not defined, Exim writes a file in its spool directory
-# using the name "exim-daemon.pid".
-
-# If you start up a daemon without the -bd option (for example, with just
-# the -q15m option), a pid file is not written. Also, if you override the
-# configuration file with the -oX option, no pid file is written. In other
-# words, the pid file is written only for a "standard" daemon.
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# If Exim creates the spool directory, it is given this mode, defaulting in the
-# source to 0750.
-
-# SPOOL_DIRECTORY_MODE=0750
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# The mode of files on the input spool which hold the contents of messages can
-# be changed here. The default is 0640 so that information from the spool is
-# available to anyone who is a member of the Exim group.
-
-# SPOOL_MODE=0640
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Moving frozen messages: If the following is uncommented, Exim is compiled
-# with support for automatically moving frozen messages out of the main spool
-# directory, a facility that is found useful by some large installations. A
-# run time option is required to cause the moving actually to occur. Such
-# messages become "invisible" to the normal management tools.
-
-# SUPPORT_MOVE_FROZEN_MESSAGES=yes
-
-
-#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Disabling the use of fsync(): DO NOT UNCOMMENT THE FOLLOWING LINE unless you
-# really, really, really know what you are doing. And even then, think again.
-# You should never uncomment this when compiling a binary for distribution.
-# Use it only when compiling Exim for your own use.
-#
-# Uncommenting this line enables the use of a runtime option called
-# disable_fsync, which can be used to stop Exim using fsync() to ensure that
-# files are written to disc before proceeding. When this is disabled, crashes
-# and hardware problems such as power outages can cause data to be lost. This
-# feature should only be used in very exceptional circumstances. YOU HAVE BEEN
-# WARNED.
-
-# ENABLE_DISABLE_FSYNC=yes
-
 HAVE_IPV6=YES
-# LOOKUP_LIBS=-lldap
-# EXTRALIBS_EXIM=-lpam
-# End of EDITME for Exim 4.
diff --git a/testing/exim/exim.pre-install b/testing/exim/exim.pre-install
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..42712e6
--- /dev/null
+++ b/testing/exim/exim.pre-install
_at_@ -0,0 +1,6 @@
+#!/bin/sh
+
+addgroup -S -g 12 mail 2>/dev/null
+adduser  -S -u 8 -h /var/spool/mail -s /sbin/nologin -g mail -G mail -D mail 2>/dev/null
+
+exit 0
-- 
2.2.0
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Received on Wed Dec 03 2014 - 08:36:57 UTC